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Operating Instructions

Practical guidance for you and your solar system.

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Shutdown Procedure

The general shutdown procedure for each solar system is:

  1. Shutdown AC Isolator/breaker at Main Switchboard
  2. Shutdown AC isolator next to inverter (where installed)
  3. Shutdown PV Array Isolator at Inverter

The reason for disconnecting the AC isolator first is that AC electricity is usually easier to disconnect and presents less shock to the system compared to the DC electricity.

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Reading your Inverter

Generally, all inverter manufacturers provide an LCD display which describes the system state and important figures. It is important for the customer to have a basic understanding of its functionalities in order to determine the state of the solar system or any potential errors that might occur.

 

ABB

The actual interface is very intuitive with three LEDs showing system status, one LED screen and four interface buttons.

The display is straightforward and displays all relevant data by cycling through it.

As shown, the display shows the inverter status ‘Inverter OK’ and its date/time. Additionally, there is a symbol of a padlock (top right corner) which symbolizes the screen is ‘frozen’ i.e. it will always display the current screen. To view other screens, please press ENTER, and two cycling arrows will appear, enabling you to go through important parameters.

Two important screens, showing the system production are E-day and E-tot screen as below:

The E-day shows the energy production for the current day, while E-tot shows the inverter’s energy production since installation.

Similar procedures can be found with all major manufacturers and their respective manuals.

How to read your electricity meter

Most meters look like the ones in the toggle to the right.

But depending on where you live and which electricity provider you are with, there are a few different types of meters installed. If your electricity meter looks different, take a look below where we have collated the major companies and their meter reading information by state.

Today, many properties are also metered through electronic smart meters which do not allow manual reading. Contact your provider to check what data is available to you or if you wish more information.

Most electricity meters

Clock face (pointer) meters

This meter has up to six clock faces. There is one hand on each clock face. The clock faces have numbers 0 to 9 and alternate between rotating clockwise and anti-clockwise.

Start reading from the left hand dial (A) and read each dial in succession to the right. When a dial hand points between two numbers, write down the lower of the two numbers. If it points between 0 and 1 write down 0 and if it points between 9 and 0 write down 9.

Pointer-Register

When a dial hand appears to be exactly on a number, as with dial (A), look at the next dial to the right to see if it has passed zero. If the next dial has not passed zero, as with dial (B), then the reading for the first dial is the lower number. In this example the reading for dial (A) is 7.

In this example the reading is 7 – 9 – 8 – 6 – 7.

Digits (cyclometer) display meters – single rate

This meter gives a direct readout of the total amount of electricity used. Read the numbers in the same sequence as shown on the meter.

cyclometer_register

In this example the reading is 7 – 2 – 4 – 2 – 1.

geneva_register

In this example the reading is: 0 – 3 – 8 – 7 – 7.

Digits (cyclometer) display meters – dual rate

These meters are similar to the Single Rate Digits (Cyclometer) Display Meters but with a dual display. Firstly, record the reading for the top display, followed by the reading for the bottom display.

In this example, the meter shows two displays – H (High/Peak) and L (Low/Off Peak). Note some meters may have the H and L displays reversed.

The reading for this example is:

Dual-Rate

H 0 – 0 – 3 – 1 – 2

L 0 – 0 – 2 – 9 – 5

Electronic digital display meters

This meter automatically cycles through the various meter readings. It is not necessary to press any buttons to read this meter, simply wait and watch as the various meter readings appear.

If a reading is missed simply wait and it will be displayed again. Enter all readings in the boxes provided.

This meter will also display readings for ‘test’, ‘date’, ‘time’ and ‘program ID’. Enter all of these readings in the boxes provided as well.

If ‘error codes E and F’ appear then there is a problem with the meter. Please report these codes on the meter reading sheet.

Electronic Digital Display Meter In this example the reading is 0 – 0 – 4 – 7 – 6 – 3.

From:

www.ergon.com.au/network/connections/metering/how-to-read-your-meter

Queensland

Ergon Energy

There are several different types of electricity meters. The following information shows you how to read them.

Clock face (pointer) meters

This meter has up to six clock faces. There is one hand on each clock face. The clock faces have numbers 0 to 9 and alternate between rotating clockwise and anti-clockwise.

Start reading from the left hand dial (A) and read each dial in succession to the right. When a dial hand points between two numbers, write down the lower of the two numbers. If it points between 0 and 1 write down 0 and if it points between 9 and 0 write down 9.

Pointer-Register

When a dial hand appears to be exactly on a number, as with dial (A), look at the next dial to the right to see if it has passed zero. If the next dial has not passed zero, as with dial (B), then the reading for the first dial is the lower number. In this example the reading for dial (A) is 7.

In this example the reading is 7 – 9 – 8 – 6 – 7.

Digits (cyclometer) display meters – single rate

This meter gives a direct readout of the total amount of electricity used. Read the numbers in the same sequence as shown on the meter.

cyclometer_register

In this example the reading is 7 – 2 – 4 – 2 – 1.

geneva_register

In this example the reading is: 0 – 3 – 8 – 7 – 7.

Digits (cyclometer) display meters – dual rate

These meters are similar to the Single Rate Digits (Cyclometer) Display Meters but with a dual display. Firstly, record the reading for the top display, followed by the reading for the bottom display.

In this example, the meter shows two displays – H (High/Peak) and L (Low/Off Peak). Note some meters may have the H and L displays reversed.

The reading for this example is:

Dual-Rate

H 0 – 0 – 3 – 1 – 2

L 0 – 0 – 2 – 9 – 5

Electronic digital display meters

This meter automatically cycles through the various meter readings. It is not necessary to press any buttons to read this meter, simply wait and watch as the various meter readings appear.

If a reading is missed simply wait and it will be displayed again. Enter all readings in the boxes provided.

This meter will also display readings for ‘test’, ‘date’, ‘time’ and ‘program ID’. Enter all of these readings in the boxes provided as well.

If ‘error codes E and F’ appear then there is a problem with the meter. Please report these codes on the meter reading sheet.

Electronic Digital Display Meter In this example the reading is 0 – 0 – 4 – 7 – 6 – 3.

From:

www.ergon.com.au/network/connections/metering/how-to-read-your-meter

Origin

Below, you’ll see what a typical meter may look like. The numbers reflect a reading of kilowatt-hours.
Most meters will show clock faces, but some will be a digital reading like this one. If your meter only shows numbers like the one below, you’ll only need to take note of the black and white numbers to indicate your usage. The red numbers are used for our testing purposes.

meter_reading.gif

How do I read the numbers on my meter?

If your meter at home looks more like a row of different clock faces, then you can read your usage by:

  • Using the four clocks on the left-most side.
  • Recording the numbers the ‘clock hand’ is pointing to, in the order they appear (left to right).
  • If the hand is between two numbers, like 3 and 4, then use the lower number.

What does an electricity meter reading look like?

electricity_meter_readings.gif

The above electricity meter is therefore recording 4,508 kilowatt-hours.

How do I calculate my own usage from my meter?

You can calculate it in the same way we do:

  1. Read your meter at the start of a billing period and record the numbers you see
  2. Read your meter again at the end of your billing period
  3. Subtract the first number you recorded from the second number you recorded and that will tell you how much gas or electricity you’ve used between readings

 

From:

www.originenergy.com.au/for-home/my-account/usage/how-to-read-my-bill/reading-your-meter.html

Simply Energy

How to read your electricity meter

Electricity meter technology has been changing from mechanical to electronic and when new meters are installed they are generally electronic. At the same time, a large number of older premises still have mechanical meters, which can be analogue or odometer types.

How you read your electricity meter depends on its type. Analogue and odometer types show the total quantity of electricity that has passed through the meter using a dial or odometer-type display.

You can calculate the amount of electricity you have consumed since your last bill by deducting the reading shown on your last bill from the current reading displayed on the meter.

Reading electronic meters is more complex because it depends on the specific meter and how it has been set up. More information about reading electronic meters is provided in the electronic meter section below.

Odometer-(cyclometer) type electricity meters

This type of meter has a mechanical display that shows the quantity of electricity consumed as a number. An example of this type of display, which is similar to a car’s odometer, is shown below. These meters display the quantity of electricity in kilowatt-hours (kWh). This example shows a meter reading of 92,992 kWh.

Some meters of this type have two displays. One is labelled as ‘H’ and the other as ‘L’. The H display shows the quantity of energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those appliances connected to the L display. The L display is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating).

Odometer-(cyclometer) type electricity meters

Electronic electricity meters

Electronic electricity meters generally have rectangular plastic cases with a digital liquid crystal display (LCD) that looks similar to the display on a pocket calculator.

This display generally shows one item of information (known as a ‘register’) at a time, along with a code or other indication that relates to the register. Pressing a ‘scroll’ or ‘display’ button on the front of the meter switches between the different registers.

An example of an electronic meter is shown below.

EMS2100 Electronic Meter

If all your energy is charged at the same rate, and you do not have any separately metered loads (such as electric hot water heating or electric space heating) or a solar photovoltaic (PV) panel system, then you can read your electronic meter by scrolling the display until it shows the total or peak register. This register is identified by a code number. See the table below for a guide to Electronic meter register code numbers.

You can calculate the amount of electricity you have consumed since your last bill by deducting the reading shown on your last bill from the current reading displayed on the meter for the appropriate register.

Information for customers with separately metered loads (such as electric hot water heating or electric space heating) or a solar photovoltaic (PV) panel system is provide in the sections that follow.

Peak and off-peak meters and time-of-use meters

The cost of purchasing electricity and delivering it to customers’ premises varies. It is generally more expensive at times when large numbers of customers are consuming high amounts. In southern Australia this is often on hot summer weekdays when many air conditioners are switched on.

Some tariffs charge different prices for electricity at different times, to reflect the different costs of the electricity. These tariffs charge a lower price at off-peak times, such as late at night and early in the morning. These tariffs require metering that can measure how much electricity is used at different times.

There are a number of ways that metering can be set up to measure consumption at different times. These include the following:

  • Separate meters for peak and off-peak loads
  • A single meter that can separately measure peak and off-peak loads. This is referred to as a meter with two registers
  • A single meter that can measure and record how much electricity is used in each half-hour (for example) of every day. This is referred to as a time-of-use meter.

Separate peak and off-peak meters

One meter is the primary meter (peak meter) and it measures the energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those connected to the off-peak meter. The peak meter records all usage by these appliances 24 hours a day.

The off-peak meter is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating). This load is switched on and off by a time switch or by signals sent to the switching device. Time switches are often set to turn on after 11:00 PM and turn off before 7:00 AM.

Separate peak and off-peak meters are generally mechanical meters (round dial or odometer (cyclometer) types). See the Analogue (round dial) electricity meters and Odometer (cyclometer) electricity meters sections above.

Meters with two registers

Some mechanical odometer (cyclometer) type meters have two displays. One is labelled as ‘H’ and the other as ‘L’. The H display shows the quantity of energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those appliances connected to the L display. The L display is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating). See the Odometer (cyclometer) electricity meters section above.

Some electronic meters have two registers (one for peak consumption and one for off-peak consumption).

These may be set up in two different ways: the method used reflects the structure of your tariff. In one way the meter is set up to record consumption by all appliances at peak times (such as 7:00 AM to 11:00 PM) in the first register and to record consumption by all appliances at off-peak times (such as 11:00 PM to 7:00 AM) in the second register.

Alternatively the meter can be set up to measure usage in the same way as separate peak and off-peak meters. When set up this way, the first register records measures the energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those connected to the off-peak register. The first register records all usage by these appliances 24 hours a day. The second register records usage by a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating).

Time-of-use meters

Time-of-use (TOU) electronic meters record the electricity consumed in each half-hour interval (for example) of every day.

TOU meters generally have two or more registers. Each register is identified by a code number. See the table below for a guide to Electronic meter register code numbers.

Some TOU meters are read by a meter reader who visits the premises and extracts consumption data from the meter. These are called ‘manually-read interval meters’. Other TOU meters are remotely read, using radio or mobile phone technology. These are called ‘remotely-read interval meters’.

Smart meters and advanced meters

Smart meters and advanced meters are electronic remotely-read interval meters that have additional functions as well as metering. An example of an additional function is remote control of the power supply to your premises. This enables the power supply to be turned off and on without the power company having to send a technician to your premises. This can be used to assist in the management of emergencies, for example

From:

www.simplyenergy.com.au/help-and-support/general-information/metering/

AGL

Basic Electricity Meter

  • A Dial Meter has four, five or six dials that look like clock faces.
  • The dials on a meter tell us how much usage that meter has recorded.
  • A meter number is located at the bottom of the meter and is like a registration number.

Standing directly in front of the meter, read the dials from left to right. Write down the corresponding figures from left to right as you read them. When a dial hand points between numbers, write down the lower of the two numbers. For example, if it points between 5 and 6, write 5, between 9 and 0, write 9.

When a dial hand appears to be exactly on a number, look at the dial to the right. If the hand on the next dial has not passed zero, the number on the preceding dial has not actually been reached and so it is the lower number.

elec meter

Lumo Energy

How do I read my electricity meter?

If you have a digital meter, simply record the numbers on your meter from left to right, ignoring the final number. In the example below the reading is 2518.

meter reading

If you have a dial meter, ignore the dials labeled 1/10 and 1/100, these are check dials.

Record the number for each dial from left to right. If a pointer falls anywhere between two numbers, always record the lower number.

gas meter

In the example above the reading is 8028.

 

From:

lumoenergy.com.au/help-centre/faqs

 

New South Wales

Lumo Energy

How do I read my electricity meter?

If you have a digital meter, simply record the numbers on your meter from left to right, ignoring the final number. In the example below the reading is 2518.

meter reading

If you have a dial meter, ignore the dials labeled 1/10 and 1/100, these are check dials.

Record the number for each dial from left to right. If a pointer falls anywhere between two numbers, always record the lower number.

gas meter

In the example above the reading is 8028.

 

From:

lumoenergy.com.au/help-centre/faqs

 

Energy Australia

New electricity smart meters

A smart meter is a new type of electricity meter that measures and records electricity use every half hour.

The smart meter rollout

The Victorian Government aims to have smart meters installed on Victorian home properties and small business sites by the end of 2013. In most cases, smart meters will be installed in the same location as existing meters.

If you have a question or want to report any concerns about your smart meter, contact your electricity distributor.

How to read your smart meter

Smart meters send meter readings directly to electricity distributors, bypassing the need for a meter-reader to come to your home in person.

Electricity meters

If don’t already have a new smart meter, your home will have either an older analogue clockface meter or an electronic meter.

How to read your old electricity meter

Clockface electricity meters

A reading is done by noting down the lowest numbers from each clock, from left to right. If a hand is between two numbers, note the lower number, except when the hand is between 0 and 9, in which case, read 9.

Electronic meters

There are two types of electronic meters:

  • EMS2100 electronic meter
  • EMS2600 electronic meter

Press the ‘display’ button to show the reading options on the screen. You can view your total usage plus usage for peak, off-peak and off-peak hot water.

 

From:

www.energyaustralia.com.au/residential/bills-and-accounts/understanding-your-meter

Simply Energy

How to read your electricity meter

Electricity meter technology has been changing from mechanical to electronic and when new meters are installed they are generally electronic. At the same time, a large number of older premises still have mechanical meters, which can be analogue or odometer types.

How you read your electricity meter depends on its type. Analogue and odometer types show the total quantity of electricity that has passed through the meter using a dial or odometer-type display.

You can calculate the amount of electricity you have consumed since your last bill by deducting the reading shown on your last bill from the current reading displayed on the meter.

Reading electronic meters is more complex because it depends on the specific meter and how it has been set up. More information about reading electronic meters is provided in the electronic meter section below.

Odometer-(cyclometer) type electricity meters

This type of meter has a mechanical display that shows the quantity of electricity consumed as a number. An example of this type of display, which is similar to a car’s odometer, is shown below. These meters display the quantity of electricity in kilowatt-hours (kWh). This example shows a meter reading of 92,992 kWh.

Some meters of this type have two displays. One is labelled as ‘H’ and the other as ‘L’. The H display shows the quantity of energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those appliances connected to the L display. The L display is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating).

Odometer-(cyclometer) type electricity meters

Electronic electricity meters

Electronic electricity meters generally have rectangular plastic cases with a digital liquid crystal display (LCD) that looks similar to the display on a pocket calculator.

This display generally shows one item of information (known as a ‘register’) at a time, along with a code or other indication that relates to the register. Pressing a ‘scroll’ or ‘display’ button on the front of the meter switches between the different registers.

An example of an electronic meter is shown below.

EMS2100 Electronic Meter

If all your energy is charged at the same rate, and you do not have any separately metered loads (such as electric hot water heating or electric space heating) or a solar photovoltaic (PV) panel system, then you can read your electronic meter by scrolling the display until it shows the total or peak register. This register is identified by a code number. See the table below for a guide to Electronic meter register code numbers.

You can calculate the amount of electricity you have consumed since your last bill by deducting the reading shown on your last bill from the current reading displayed on the meter for the appropriate register.

Information for customers with separately metered loads (such as electric hot water heating or electric space heating) or a solar photovoltaic (PV) panel system is provide in the sections that follow.

Peak and off-peak meters and time-of-use meters

The cost of purchasing electricity and delivering it to customers’ premises varies. It is generally more expensive at times when large numbers of customers are consuming high amounts. In southern Australia this is often on hot summer weekdays when many air conditioners are switched on.

Some tariffs charge different prices for electricity at different times, to reflect the different costs of the electricity. These tariffs charge a lower price at off-peak times, such as late at night and early in the morning. These tariffs require metering that can measure how much electricity is used at different times.

There are a number of ways that metering can be set up to measure consumption at different times. These include the following:

  • Separate meters for peak and off-peak loads
  • A single meter that can separately measure peak and off-peak loads. This is referred to as a meter with two registers
  • A single meter that can measure and record how much electricity is used in each half-hour (for example) of every day. This is referred to as a time-of-use meter.

Separate peak and off-peak meters

One meter is the primary meter (peak meter) and it measures the energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those connected to the off-peak meter. The peak meter records all usage by these appliances 24 hours a day.

The off-peak meter is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating). This load is switched on and off by a time switch or by signals sent to the switching device. Time switches are often set to turn on after 11:00 PM and turn off before 7:00 AM.

Separate peak and off-peak meters are generally mechanical meters (round dial or odometer (cyclometer) types). See the Analogue (round dial) electricity meters and Odometer (cyclometer) electricity meters sections above.

Meters with two registers

Some mechanical odometer (cyclometer) type meters have two displays. One is labelled as ‘H’ and the other as ‘L’. The H display shows the quantity of energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those appliances connected to the L display. The L display is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating). See the Odometer (cyclometer) electricity meters section above.

Some electronic meters have two registers (one for peak consumption and one for off-peak consumption).

These may be set up in two different ways: the method used reflects the structure of your tariff. In one way the meter is set up to record consumption by all appliances at peak times (such as 7:00 AM to 11:00 PM) in the first register and to record consumption by all appliances at off-peak times (such as 11:00 PM to 7:00 AM) in the second register.

Alternatively the meter can be set up to measure usage in the same way as separate peak and off-peak meters. When set up this way, the first register records measures the energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those connected to the off-peak register. The first register records all usage by these appliances 24 hours a day. The second register records usage by a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating).

Time-of-use meters

Time-of-use (TOU) electronic meters record the electricity consumed in each half-hour interval (for example) of every day.

TOU meters generally have two or more registers. Each register is identified by a code number. See the table below for a guide to Electronic meter register code numbers.

Some TOU meters are read by a meter reader who visits the premises and extracts consumption data from the meter. These are called ‘manually-read interval meters’. Other TOU meters are remotely read, using radio or mobile phone technology. These are called ‘remotely-read interval meters’.

Smart meters and advanced meters

Smart meters and advanced meters are electronic remotely-read interval meters that have additional functions as well as metering. An example of an additional function is remote control of the power supply to your premises. This enables the power supply to be turned off and on without the power company having to send a technician to your premises. This can be used to assist in the management of emergencies, for example

From:

www.simplyenergy.com.au/help-and-support/general-information/metering/

ActewAGL

Analogue electricity meter with dials

The analogue electricity meter used as an example below uses five dials to give a reading.

  • Starting from the left-hand dial (10,000), record the numbers from left to right
  • When a dial hand points between numbers, record the lower number

Electricity analogue meter showing dials
Using our example image above, the numbers recorded should be 3-4-9-4-6. This reading shows 34,946 kilowatt hours of electricity.

Are you confused by the second number recorded from the dial reading in this image?

  • In the above example, the “1000” dial appears to be indicating that the pointer is on the number 5, but if you look closely you will see that the pointer has not quite reached the number 5. This is because the “100” dial (to its right) has not completed a full revolution yet (it is between numbers).Once it does, the “1000” dial will move fully to the next number, 5. For now, the correct reading is 4.

Note
Not all dial meter displays look like the above example. In some meters, the placement of numbers in each dial runs in the opposite direction to the dials shown above.

 

Odometer electricity meter

This analogue electricity meter looks like an odometer in your car. Numbers are read from left to right.

The meter has five white digits that show the kilowatt hours of electricity that have been used.

Electricity odometer type meter showing numbers
The above image shows 92,992 kilowatt hours of electricity.

 

 

Electronic electricity meter

The electronic electricity meter is read using the display button to switch through a series of screens. All readings are recorded in a non-volatile electronic memory, so no readings will be lost in the event the meter loses power.

ActewAGL uses many different styles of electronic meters. The following illustration and instructions pertain to a common example of the electronic electricity meter.

Diagram of electronic electricity meter showing screen, button functions and communications socketTo read the meter, press the display button. The first screen is the test pattern and shows a series of eights. To read the other screens, press the display button to move onto the next one. Beside each reading a number will appear:

  • 01 shows the time
  • 03 shows the total main circuit kWh reading
  • 07 shows the total off-peak reading
  • 13 – 14 show ‘on’ and ‘off’ times for the first off-peak period
  • 15 – 16 show ‘on’ and ‘off’ times for the second off-peak period
  • 18 shows the serial number of the meter

Note
Not all electronic electricity meters look like the illustration above. For example, the latest meters installed display the kilowatt hours used in three separate registers.

 

 

Time Of Use electricity meter

Time of Use (TOU) meters have been installed on the ActewAGL network since 2007. All customers connecting new premises or impacted by our Meter Replacement program will be provided with a TOU meter.

TOU meters have a scroll rate of five seconds for each display window. To manually scroll through each window, momentarily press the right-hand button to access the next screen. In some cases this button will activate the boost function for controlled loads (such as storage hot water) if the button is pressed for five seconds. Boost mode switches on controlled load devices outside of programmed off-peak operation times.

Daigram of Time of use meter showing indications of where the LCD display, serial and ownership numbers and button functions are located

Note:
Not all TOU meters look like the illustration above.

For more detailed information on how to read 3-phase meters (sprint 200), single-phase single element meters (with green push buttons) and single-phase twin element meters (with blue push buttons) you can download our guide to reading TOU meters (PDF, 300kb).

Note:
The default display for all customers will be a TOU display, however consumption will be billed as per the pricing plan you have in place with your retailer.

 

From:

www.actewagl.com.au/Help-and-advice/How-to-read-your-meters.aspx

AGL

Basic Electricity Meter

  • A Dial Meter has four, five or six dials that look like clock faces.
  • The dials on a meter tell us how much usage that meter has recorded.
  • A meter number is located at the bottom of the meter and is like a registration number.

Standing directly in front of the meter, read the dials from left to right. Write down the corresponding figures from left to right as you read them. When a dial hand points between numbers, write down the lower of the two numbers. For example, if it points between 5 and 6, write 5, between 9 and 0, write 9.

When a dial hand appears to be exactly on a number, look at the dial to the right. If the hand on the next dial has not passed zero, the number on the preceding dial has not actually been reached and so it is the lower number.

elec meter

South Australia

Lumo Energy

How do I read my electricity meter?

If you have a digital meter, simply record the numbers on your meter from left to right, ignoring the final number. In the example below the reading is 2518.

meter reading

If you have a dial meter, ignore the dials labeled 1/10 and 1/100, these are check dials.

Record the number for each dial from left to right. If a pointer falls anywhere between two numbers, always record the lower number.

gas meter

In the example above the reading is 8028.

 

From:

lumoenergy.com.au/help-centre/faqs

 

Energy Australia

New electricity smart meters

A smart meter is a new type of electricity meter that measures and records electricity use every half hour.

The smart meter rollout

The Victorian Government aims to have smart meters installed on Victorian home properties and small business sites by the end of 2013. In most cases, smart meters will be installed in the same location as existing meters.

If you have a question or want to report any concerns about your smart meter, contact your electricity distributor.

How to read your smart meter

Smart meters send meter readings directly to electricity distributors, bypassing the need for a meter-reader to come to your home in person.

Electricity meters

If don’t already have a new smart meter, your home will have either an older analogue clockface meter or an electronic meter.

How to read your old electricity meter

Clockface electricity meters

A reading is done by noting down the lowest numbers from each clock, from left to right. If a hand is between two numbers, note the lower number, except when the hand is between 0 and 9, in which case, read 9.

Electronic meters

There are two types of electronic meters:

  • EMS2100 electronic meter
  • EMS2600 electronic meter

Press the ‘display’ button to show the reading options on the screen. You can view your total usage plus usage for peak, off-peak and off-peak hot water.

 

From:

www.energyaustralia.com.au/residential/bills-and-accounts/understanding-your-meter

AGL

Basic Electricity Meter

  • A Dial Meter has four, five or six dials that look like clock faces.
  • The dials on a meter tell us how much usage that meter has recorded.
  • A meter number is located at the bottom of the meter and is like a registration number.

Standing directly in front of the meter, read the dials from left to right. Write down the corresponding figures from left to right as you read them. When a dial hand points between numbers, write down the lower of the two numbers. For example, if it points between 5 and 6, write 5, between 9 and 0, write 9.

When a dial hand appears to be exactly on a number, look at the dial to the right. If the hand on the next dial has not passed zero, the number on the preceding dial has not actually been reached and so it is the lower number.

elec meter

Victoria

Origin

Below, you’ll see what a typical meter may look like. The numbers reflect a reading of kilowatt-hours.
Most meters will show clock faces, but some will be a digital reading like this one. If your meter only shows numbers like the one below, you’ll only need to take note of the black and white numbers to indicate your usage. The red numbers are used for our testing purposes.

meter_reading.gif

How do I read the numbers on my meter?

If your meter at home looks more like a row of different clock faces, then you can read your usage by:

  • Using the four clocks on the left-most side.
  • Recording the numbers the ‘clock hand’ is pointing to, in the order they appear (left to right).
  • If the hand is between two numbers, like 3 and 4, then use the lower number.

What does an electricity meter reading look like?

electricity_meter_readings.gif

The above electricity meter is therefore recording 4,508 kilowatt-hours.

How do I calculate my own usage from my meter?

You can calculate it in the same way we do:

  1. Read your meter at the start of a billing period and record the numbers you see
  2. Read your meter again at the end of your billing period
  3. Subtract the first number you recorded from the second number you recorded and that will tell you how much gas or electricity you’ve used between readings

 

From:

www.originenergy.com.au/for-home/my-account/usage/how-to-read-my-bill/reading-your-meter.html

Simply Energy

How to read your electricity meter

Electricity meter technology has been changing from mechanical to electronic and when new meters are installed they are generally electronic. At the same time, a large number of older premises still have mechanical meters, which can be analogue or odometer types.

How you read your electricity meter depends on its type. Analogue and odometer types show the total quantity of electricity that has passed through the meter using a dial or odometer-type display.

You can calculate the amount of electricity you have consumed since your last bill by deducting the reading shown on your last bill from the current reading displayed on the meter.

Reading electronic meters is more complex because it depends on the specific meter and how it has been set up. More information about reading electronic meters is provided in the electronic meter section below.

Odometer-(cyclometer) type electricity meters

This type of meter has a mechanical display that shows the quantity of electricity consumed as a number. An example of this type of display, which is similar to a car’s odometer, is shown below. These meters display the quantity of electricity in kilowatt-hours (kWh). This example shows a meter reading of 92,992 kWh.

Some meters of this type have two displays. One is labelled as ‘H’ and the other as ‘L’. The H display shows the quantity of energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those appliances connected to the L display. The L display is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating).

Odometer-(cyclometer) type electricity meters

Electronic electricity meters

Electronic electricity meters generally have rectangular plastic cases with a digital liquid crystal display (LCD) that looks similar to the display on a pocket calculator.

This display generally shows one item of information (known as a ‘register’) at a time, along with a code or other indication that relates to the register. Pressing a ‘scroll’ or ‘display’ button on the front of the meter switches between the different registers.

An example of an electronic meter is shown below.

EMS2100 Electronic Meter

If all your energy is charged at the same rate, and you do not have any separately metered loads (such as electric hot water heating or electric space heating) or a solar photovoltaic (PV) panel system, then you can read your electronic meter by scrolling the display until it shows the total or peak register. This register is identified by a code number. See the table below for a guide to Electronic meter register code numbers.

You can calculate the amount of electricity you have consumed since your last bill by deducting the reading shown on your last bill from the current reading displayed on the meter for the appropriate register.

Information for customers with separately metered loads (such as electric hot water heating or electric space heating) or a solar photovoltaic (PV) panel system is provide in the sections that follow.

Peak and off-peak meters and time-of-use meters

The cost of purchasing electricity and delivering it to customers’ premises varies. It is generally more expensive at times when large numbers of customers are consuming high amounts. In southern Australia this is often on hot summer weekdays when many air conditioners are switched on.

Some tariffs charge different prices for electricity at different times, to reflect the different costs of the electricity. These tariffs charge a lower price at off-peak times, such as late at night and early in the morning. These tariffs require metering that can measure how much electricity is used at different times.

There are a number of ways that metering can be set up to measure consumption at different times. These include the following:

  • Separate meters for peak and off-peak loads
  • A single meter that can separately measure peak and off-peak loads. This is referred to as a meter with two registers
  • A single meter that can measure and record how much electricity is used in each half-hour (for example) of every day. This is referred to as a time-of-use meter.

Separate peak and off-peak meters

One meter is the primary meter (peak meter) and it measures the energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those connected to the off-peak meter. The peak meter records all usage by these appliances 24 hours a day.

The off-peak meter is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating). This load is switched on and off by a time switch or by signals sent to the switching device. Time switches are often set to turn on after 11:00 PM and turn off before 7:00 AM.

Separate peak and off-peak meters are generally mechanical meters (round dial or odometer (cyclometer) types). See the Analogue (round dial) electricity meters and Odometer (cyclometer) electricity meters sections above.

Meters with two registers

Some mechanical odometer (cyclometer) type meters have two displays. One is labelled as ‘H’ and the other as ‘L’. The H display shows the quantity of energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those appliances connected to the L display. The L display is usually dedicated to a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating). See the Odometer (cyclometer) electricity meters section above.

Some electronic meters have two registers (one for peak consumption and one for off-peak consumption).

These may be set up in two different ways: the method used reflects the structure of your tariff. In one way the meter is set up to record consumption by all appliances at peak times (such as 7:00 AM to 11:00 PM) in the first register and to record consumption by all appliances at off-peak times (such as 11:00 PM to 7:00 AM) in the second register.

Alternatively the meter can be set up to measure usage in the same way as separate peak and off-peak meters. When set up this way, the first register records measures the energy delivered to all appliances in the premises except those connected to the off-peak register. The first register records all usage by these appliances 24 hours a day. The second register records usage by a specific load (such as hot water heating or slab heating).

Time-of-use meters

Time-of-use (TOU) electronic meters record the electricity consumed in each half-hour interval (for example) of every day.

TOU meters generally have two or more registers. Each register is identified by a code number. See the table below for a guide to Electronic meter register code numbers.

Some TOU meters are read by a meter reader who visits the premises and extracts consumption data from the meter. These are called ‘manually-read interval meters’. Other TOU meters are remotely read, using radio or mobile phone technology. These are called ‘remotely-read interval meters’.

Smart meters and advanced meters

Smart meters and advanced meters are electronic remotely-read interval meters that have additional functions as well as metering. An example of an additional function is remote control of the power supply to your premises. This enables the power supply to be turned off and on without the power company having to send a technician to your premises. This can be used to assist in the management of emergencies, for example

From:

www.simplyenergy.com.au/help-and-support/general-information/metering/

Lumo Energy

How do I read my electricity meter?

If you have a digital meter, simply record the numbers on your meter from left to right, ignoring the final number. In the example below the reading is 2518.

meter reading

If you have a dial meter, ignore the dials labeled 1/10 and 1/100, these are check dials.

Record the number for each dial from left to right. If a pointer falls anywhere between two numbers, always record the lower number.

gas meter

In the example above the reading is 8028.

 

From:

lumoenergy.com.au/help-centre/faqs

 

AGL

Basic Electricity Meter.

  • A Dial Meter has four, five or six dials that look like clock faces.
  • The dials on a meter tell us how much usage that meter has recorded.
  • A meter number is located at the bottom of the meter and is like a registration number.

Standing directly in front of the meter, read the dials from left to right. Write down the corresponding figures from left to right as you read them. When a dial hand points between numbers, write down the lower of the two numbers. For example, if it points between 5 and 6, write 5, between 9 and 0, write 9.

When a dial hand appears to be exactly on a number, look at the dial to the right. If the hand on the next dial has not passed zero, the number on the preceding dial has not actually been reached and so it is the lower number.

elec meter

Australian Capital Territory

Ergon Energy

There are several different types of electricity meters. The following information shows you how to read them.

Clock face (pointer) meters

This meter has up to six clock faces. There is one hand on each clock face. The clock faces have numbers 0 to 9 and alternate between rotating clockwise and anti-clockwise.

Start reading from the left hand dial (A) and read each dial in succession to the right. When a dial hand points between two numbers, write down the lower of the two numbers. If it points between 0 and 1 write down 0 and if it points between 9 and 0 write down 9.

Pointer-Register

When a dial hand appears to be exactly on a number, as with dial (A), look at the next dial to the right to see if it has passed zero. If the next dial has not passed zero, as with dial (B), then the reading for the first dial is the lower number. In this example the reading for dial (A) is 7.

In this example the reading is 7 – 9 – 8 – 6 – 7.

Digits (cyclometer) display meters – single rate

This meter gives a direct readout of the total amount of electricity used. Read the numbers in the same sequence as shown on the meter.

cyclometer_register

In this example the reading is 7 – 2 – 4 – 2 – 1.

geneva_register

In this example the reading is: 0 – 3 – 8 – 7 – 7.

Digits (cyclometer) display meters – dual rate

These meters are similar to the Single Rate Digits (Cyclometer) Display Meters but with a dual display. Firstly, record the reading for the top display, followed by the reading for the bottom display.

In this example, the meter shows two displays – H (High/Peak) and L (Low/Off Peak). Note some meters may have the H and L displays reversed.

The reading for this example is:

Dual-Rate

H 0 – 0 – 3 – 1 – 2

L 0 – 0 – 2 – 9 – 5

Electronic digital display meters

This meter automatically cycles through the various meter readings. It is not necessary to press any buttons to read this meter, simply wait and watch as the various meter readings appear.

If a reading is missed simply wait and it will be displayed again. Enter all readings in the boxes provided.

This meter will also display readings for ‘test’, ‘date’, ‘time’ and ‘program ID’. Enter all of these readings in the boxes provided as well.

If ‘error codes E and F’ appear then there is a problem with the meter. Please report these codes on the meter reading sheet.

Electronic Digital Display Meter In this example the reading is 0 – 0 – 4 – 7 – 6 – 3.

Solar meters (inverter energy system meters)

If you have a solar meter, the meter model type is displayed on the front panel label on the front of the meter. The digital display has two sections, the Display ID (or code) and the Display Data (or the actual reading).

There’s no need to push any buttons on the meter to obtain the reading. A test screen will initially display as a series of 8s. This will ensure the digital display is working correctly.

The data displayed on your meter depends on your electricity supply. For example, do you have separate hot water metering, or is your supply single or multiphase?

Generated solar energy will be used by appliances and any excess generation will be recorded on the display ID.

There are a number of different solar meter types. The following information shows you how to read them.

EM1000 Meter – meter used for single tariff installations (Tariff 11 or 20)

EM1000 Meter display

Display Data Display ID Explanation of Reading
Display Test Screen A B C D The test displays first as a series of 8s
Total Import kWh (from electricity distributor) (Blank) Energy (kWh) used from the electricity network
Total Export kWh (excess to electricity distributor) Excess energy (kWh) sent back to the electricity network (occurs when appliance usage is less than energy generated by the solar panels)

EM1200 Meter – meter used for two tariff installations (Tariff 11, 33 or 31)

EM1200 Meter display

Display Data Display ID Explanation of Reading
Display Test Screen

88

The test displays first as a series of 8s
Date

02

Present date
Time

03

Present time
Rate A kWh Element 1 (Peak)
*Only applicable if primary tariff is time of use, eg T62 or T22

04*

Energy (kWh) used from the electricity network between 7am- 9pm Monday-Friday – High Rate
Rate C kWh Element 1 (Off Peak)
*Only applicable if primary tariff is time of use, eg T62 or T22

05*

Energy (kWh) used from the electricity network between 9pm- 7am Monday-Friday and all weekend – Low Rate
Total Import kWh Element 1
(from electricity distributor)

06

Energy (kWh) used from the electricity network on primary tariff (eg Tariff 11)
Sum of 04 & 05 if applicable
Total Export kWh Element 1 & Element 2
(excess to electricity distributor)

07

Excess energy (kWh) sent back to the electricity network (occurs when appliance usage is less than energy generated by the solar panels)
Total Import kWh Element 2
(from electricity distributor)

09

Energy (kWh) used on secondary tariff (ie Tariff 31 or 33)
Program ID

10

Meter program number – electricity distributor use only

NOTE: New EM1200 meters manufactured from 2012 will not have the Test Display or the Date and Time displays.

MK 10 Meter – multipurpose installations (Tariff 11, 20, 22 or 62)

MK 10 Meter display

Display Data Display ID Explanation of Reading
Display Test Screen

888

The test displays first as a series of 8s
Date

001

Present date
Time

002

Present time
Total kWh
(from electricity distributor)

003

Total energy (kWh) used from the electricity network. Equals sum of 004, 005 and 006
Rate A kWh(from electricity distributor)

004

Energy (kWh) used from the electricity network between 7am- 9pm Monday-Friday
Rate B kWh
(from electricity distributor)

005

Energy (kWh) used from the electricity network between 9pm- 11pm Monday-Friday
Rate C kWh
(from electricity distributor)

006

Energy (kWh) used from the electricity network at all other times
Previous Maximum kW

011

Previous demand – electricity distributor use only
Current Cumulative kW

012

Current demand – billing use for demand trials
Current Maximum kW

013

Highest maximum demand recorded since last reset – electricity distributor use only
Demand Reset Count

040

Number of times demand reset- electricity distributor use only
Program ID

042

Meter program number – electricity distributor use only
Alarm

057

Displays alarm code – electricity distributor use only
Total kWh Export
(excess to electricity distributor)

114

Excess energy (kWh) sent back to electricity network (occurs when appliance usage is less than energy generated by the solar panels)

Q4 Meter – multipurpose installations (Tariff 11, 20, 22 or 62)

Q4 Meter display

Display Data Display ID Explanation of Reading
Display Test Screen

888

The test displays first as a series of 8s
Date

001

Present date
Time

002

Present time
Total kWh
(from electricity distributor)

003

Total energy (kWh) used from the electricity network. Equals sum of 004, 005 and 006
Rate A kWh(from electricity distributor)

004

Energy (kWh) used from the electricity network between 7am- 9pm Monday-Friday
Rate B kWh
(from electricity distributor)

005

Energy (kWh) used from the electricity network between 9pm- 11pm Monday-Friday
Rate C kWh
(from electricity distributor)

006

Energy (kWh) used from the electricity network at all other times
Previous Cumulative kW

011

Previous demand – electricity distributor use only
Current Cumulative kW

012

Current demand – billing use for demand trials
Current Maximum kW

013

Highest maximum demand recorded since last reset – electricity distributor use only
Demand Reset Count

040

Number of times demand reset- electricity distributor use only
Program ID

042

Meter program number – electricity distributor use only
Total kWh Export
(excess to electricity distributor)

114

Excess energy (kWh) sent back to electricity network. Equals sum of 115, 116 and 117
Rate A kWh Export
(excess to electricity distributor)

115

Excess energy (kWh) sent back to the electricity network between 7am- 9pm Monday-Friday
Rate B kWh Export
(excess to electricity distributor)

116

Excess energy (kWh) sent back to the electricity network between 9pm- 11pm Monday-Friday
Rate C kWh Export
(excess to electricity distributor)

117

Excess energy (kWh) sent back to the electricity network at all other times

Note that displays 115 – 117 have been discontinued in IES meters manufactured from September 2009.

 

www.ergon.com.au/network/connections/metering/how-to-read-your-meter

ActewAGL

Analogue electricity meter with dials

The analogue electricity meter used as an example below uses five dials to give a reading.

  • Starting from the left-hand dial (10,000), record the numbers from left to right
  • When a dial hand points between numbers, record the lower number

Electricity analogue meter showing dials
Using our example image above, the numbers recorded should be 3-4-9-4-6. This reading shows 34,946 kilowatt hours of electricity.

Are you confused by the second number recorded from the dial reading in this image?

  • In the above example, the “1000” dial appears to be indicating that the pointer is on the number 5, but if you look closely you will see that the pointer has not quite reached the number 5. This is because the “100” dial (to its right) has not completed a full revolution yet (it is between numbers).Once it does, the “1000” dial will move fully to the next number, 5. For now, the correct reading is 4.

Note
Not all dial meter displays look like the above example. In some meters, the placement of numbers in each dial runs in the opposite direction to the dials shown above.

 

Odometer electricity meter

This analogue electricity meter looks like an odometer in your car. Numbers are read from left to right.

The meter has five white digits that show the kilowatt hours of electricity that have been used.

Electricity odometer type meter showing numbers
The above image shows 92,992 kilowatt hours of electricity.

 

 

Electronic electricity meter

The electronic electricity meter is read using the display button to switch through a series of screens. All readings are recorded in a non-volatile electronic memory, so no readings will be lost in the event the meter loses power.

ActewAGL uses many different styles of electronic meters. The following illustration and instructions pertain to a common example of the electronic electricity meter.

Diagram of electronic electricity meter showing screen, button functions and communications socketTo read the meter, press the display button. The first screen is the test pattern and shows a series of eights. To read the other screens, press the display button to move onto the next one. Beside each reading a number will appear:

  • 01 shows the time
  • 03 shows the total main circuit kWh reading
  • 07 shows the total off-peak reading
  • 13 – 14 show ‘on’ and ‘off’ times for the first off-peak period
  • 15 – 16 show ‘on’ and ‘off’ times for the second off-peak period
  • 18 shows the serial number of the meter

Note
Not all electronic electricity meters look like the illustration above. For example, the latest meters installed display the kilowatt hours used in three separate registers.

 

 

Time Of Use electricity meter

Time of Use (TOU) meters have been installed on the ActewAGL network since 2007. All customers connecting new premises or impacted by our Meter Replacement program will be provided with a TOU meter.

TOU meters have a scroll rate of five seconds for each display window. To manually scroll through each window, momentarily press the right-hand button to access the next screen. In some cases this button will activate the boost function for controlled loads (such as storage hot water) if the button is pressed for five seconds. Boost mode switches on controlled load devices outside of programmed off-peak operation times.

Daigram of Time of use meter showing indications of where the LCD display, serial and ownership numbers and button functions are located

Note:
Not all TOU meters look like the illustration above.

For more detailed information on how to read 3-phase meters (sprint 200), single-phase single element meters (with green push buttons) and single-phase twin element meters (with blue push buttons) you can download our guide to reading TOU meters (PDF, 300kb).

Note:
The default display for all customers will be a TOU display, however consumption will be billed as per the pricing plan you have in place with your retailer.

 

www.actewagl.com.au/Help-and-advice/How-to-read-your-meters.aspx

Western Australia

Horizon Power

How to read your advanced meter:

Horizon Power has advanced electronic meters installed at all connection points throughout regional and remote Western Australia.  These meters are read and monitored remotely and are manufactured to a standard that has been approved by the National Measurement Institute of Australia. As these meters are read automatically, you are not required to have a physical meter read at your property. However, you may still wish to read the meter to monitor your electricity use or to see how much electricity you have exported to the network.

There are several types of advanced meters including a single phase electronic meter, a three phase electronic meter and a plug-in electronic meter. Below is a step-by-step guide on how to read each meter.

The single phase and three-phase electronic meters have five different displays that rotate through automatically every five seconds or can be rotated manually by pressing button 1 on the meter. The number that appears at the top right-hand corner of the display identifies which ‘register’ the meter is on. The two main registers are register ‘07’ which reads electricity consumption, and register ‘47’ which reads exported energy.

 

Below is a brief explanation of what each screen displays;

1.    The first screen displays the time.
2.    The second screen displays the date.
3.    The third screen is the 07 register. This is the screen to read your electricity consumption.
4.    The fourth screen is the 47 register. This is the screen to read your exported excess energy.
5.    The fifth is testing the meter LCD display.

 

 

The plug-in electronic meter automatically rotates every five seconds through its displays. You can manually scroll through the displays by using the ‘select’ button. The displays include the meter’s connection status, frequency and electricity usage. The number and/or letters on the left hand side of the display signify what ‘register’ you are on;

007 = This register reads your electricity consumption in kW/h.

047 = This register reads your exported excess energy.

dCon = This register shows the connection status of the meter.

  • If this says 0 (and the pulse light is off) then the meter is disconnected and disabled. The customer cannot do anything with the meter and will need to call Horizon Power to have it reactivated.
  • If this says 2 (and the pulse light is blinking) then the meter is disconnected and ready to be connected. Press the ‘Connect’ button for a few seconds and wait to hear a click. Your meter is nowconnected.
  • If this says 3 (and the pulse light is blinking/on) then the meter is connected and working.

Download fact sheet www.horizonpower.com.au/media/1959/hp_3_17660-advanced-meter-information-sheet.pdf

From:

www.horizonpower.com.au/for-home/manage-my-power-supply/reading-my-meter/

Western Power

How do I read my dial meter?

Clock-face dial meters have four, five or six dials, which alternate in direction.
To read these meters:

  • stand directly in front of the meter
  • starting from the left, read each dial and write down the figures
  • when a hand is between two numbers, write down the lower of the two; except when the hand is between 0 and 9, then write down 9
  • for example, the readings in the diagram are 2-7-0-3-8, that is, 27,038 kilowatt hours

How do I read my digital meter?

The electro-mechanical digital display meters have a six-digit display similar to the odometer of your car. To read these meters simply write down the figures that are displayed.

How do I read my electronic meter?

Electronic meters on a standard residential or commercial tariff (A1, L1, K1 or M1) have a static register, so simply write down the displayed numbers.

However, if the register moves through a sequence of displays (or channels) then, the numbers that you need to record depends on your tariff. Use this table to ascertain the meter register displays/channels.

Channel Name / Description
01 Meter Code
02 Meter Serial Number
03 Programme ID Number
04 Time
05 Date
06 Kilowatt hours/Pulse
07 Total Kilowatt hours
08 Present Demand
09 Reset Number
10 On Peak Kilowatt Hours
11 On Peak Indicative Demand
12 On Peak Cumulative Demand
20 Off Peak Kilowatt Hours
21 Off Peak Indicative Demand
22 Off Peak Cumulative Demand
30 Weekdays High Shoulder Kilowatt Hours
40 Weekends Low Shoulder Kilowatt Hours
  • Not all channels are displayed on all meters. This depends on your tariff.
  • Customers on R1 tariff should record the figures from channels 10 and 20
  • Customers on SM1 (Smart Power) tariff should record the figures from channels 10, 20, 30 and 40
  • Customers on time-based demand tariffs S1 and T1 should record channels 10, 12, 20 and 22

How do I read my bi-directional meter?

Bi-directional meters measure your energy consumption and your net energy generation. If you have installed a system which generates energy into Western Power’s grid then you should have a bi-directional meter. It is normally fitted as part of the process for successful applicants to Synergy’s Reverse Energy Buyback Scheme (REBS), but also applies to customers with generation systems who are not part of the scheme.

How do I read my smart meter?

A sophisticated meter that records the electricity usage in half hour intervals as well as total consumption, a smart meter is capable of sending this information daily to Western Power.

Smart meters are part of a wider Western Power initiative called Smart Grid which seeks to take a traditional “poles and wires” electricity grid into the future by adding digital and communication technology.

 

From:

www.westernpower.com.au/support/meter-reading-faqs/

Northern Territory

Power and Water Corporation

Download PDF:

www.powerwater.com.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/2627/How_to_read_your_power_meter_July_2008.pdf

 

Tasmania

Aurora Energy

How to read your meter

Knowing how to read your meters can help you to keep track of your electricity consumption.How to read your type of meter:
A dial electricity meter
Reading your dial meter
  • Stand directly in front of your meter so you can tell the exact position of the pointer of each dial.
  • Read the dial on the left first. (Ignore the dial underneath.)
  • Look at the two numbers the pointer is between and record the lowest number. (If the pointer is between 9 and 0, record 9.)
  • Do the same with each meter, reading left to right.
A digital electricity meter
Reading your digital meter

The digital meter is simple to read. You just have to read the number that appears on the display as below for each electricity tariff that is attached to that meter.

For the most common digital or dual rate meters, the display will automatically cycle through the registers. This includes the following information:

  • 10 – Element 1 (Tariff 22 or 31 — light and power)
  • 20 – Element 2 (Tariff 41, 42, 61 or 62 if applicable — HydroHeat, hot water and/or OffPeak)

To ensure you know which tariff each element referes to, please check the back of your bill, which details your tariffs.

A solar electricity meter
Reading your solar meter

For the most common digital or dual rate meters, the display will automatically cycle through the registers. This includes the following information:

  • 01 – Date
  • 02 – Time
  • 03 – Import to grid – Electricity you have generated back into the grid
  • 04 – Export from grid – Electricity you have bought to run light and power (Tariff 1)
  • 05 – Export from grid – Electricity you have bought to run hot water or OffPeak (Tariff 2)
  • 90 – Relay 1 status
  • 91 – Relay 2 status (if applicable)

‘Import to grid’ records the power flowing from the solar inverter into the grid, which occurs when there is minimal electrical consumption in the house and the solar array is producing more power than the house is using. For example, if your house is consuming 50 watts on Tariff 31 and the solar array contributes 200 watts, this register records 150 watts of power flowing from the solar inverter to the grid.

‘Export from grid’ register records the power flowing from the grid into the house, which occurs when there is greater electrical consumption in the house than the solar inverter is producing. For example, if your house is consuming 1000 watts on Tariff 31 and the solar array contributes only 200 watts, this register records 800 watts of power flowing from the grid to the house.

Please note scrolling between these registers does not show all the energy produced by the co-generation unit, only the power that is flowing to and from the grid.

An odometer electricity meter

Reading your odometer meter

Another kind of analogue electricity meter reads like an odometer in your car. Numbers are read from left to right.

The meter has five white digits that show the kilowatt hours of electricity that have been used.

www.auroraenergy.com.au/your-home/electricity/meters-poles-wires/how-to-read-your-meter

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